Remote Sensing and Space Sciences (RSSS) is a broad discipline examining the interaction of electromagnetic fields with material media, concentrating on applications to the space sciences. It encompasses research areas such as aeronomy, geosciences, atmospheric science, remote sensing, wave propagation, electro-optics, plasma science, signal processing, and communications. RSSS researchers develop and use a variety of radio and optical techniques to probe the Earth's upper atmosphere to learn its physical, chemical, and dynamic processes. These techniques include lidar, optical imaging, interferometric, MF (medium frequency) radar, meteor radar, the global positioning system (GPS) and incoherent backscatter radar.

The RSSS group at the University of Illinois carries out a wide range of theoretical and experimental programs around the world involving lidar systems, laser ranging and altimetry, optical communications, geophysical imaging, and signal and image processing. Two advanced lidar systems use atmospheric sodium and iron as scattering media from metals deposited by meteors in the upper atmosphere. Optical imaging, spectroscopy, and interferometry are employed to passively observe atmospheric emission and scattering processes. Rocket and CubeSat platforms are used to directly probe these regions of the near-space environment. Field campaigns include the use of spacecraft and aircraft platforms as well as a number of ground stations, such as Antarctica, Greenland, Kwajalein (Marshall Islands), Peru, Chile, Australia, Puerto Rico, and US sites in Urbana, IL, New Mexico and Hawaii.

Remote Sensing and Space Sciences (RSSS) is a broad discipline examining the interaction of electromagnetic fields with material media, with a concentration on applications to the space sciences. It encompasses research areas such as aeronomy, geosciences, atmospheric science, remote sensing, wave propagation, electro-optics, plasma science, signal processing, and communications. Researchers use radar, lidar, and passive optical techniques to probe the Earth's upper atmosphere to learn its physical, chemical, and dynamic processes. Wave propagation studies are performed with MF (medium frequency) radar, meteor radar, the global positioning system (GPS) and incoherent backscatter radar.

Researchers carry out a wide range of theoretical and experimental programs in lidar systems, laser ranging and altimetry, optical communications, geophysical imaging, and signal and image processing. Two advanced lidar systems use atmospheric sodium and iron as scattering media from metals deposited by meteors in the upper atmosphere. Optical imaging, spectroscopy, and interferometry are employed to passively observe atmospheric emission and scattering processes. Field campaigns include the use of spacecraft and aircraft platforms as well as a number of ground stations, such as Antarctica, Greenland, Peru, Chile, Australia, Puerto Rico, and US sites in Urbana, IL, New Mexico and Hawaii.

Recent News

ECE ILLINOIS offers first Big Data class for undergrads

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ECE Illinois has a story about the new Big Data class being offered by, among others, Prof. Makela and Prof. Kamalabadi.  The full story can be found here.

Near-space study helping to predict storms

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Prof. Makela's research on tsunami monitoring using the ionosphere as a sensor is summarized in this College of Engineering article.

Students design device that will feel the heat

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Students in ECE Illinois' Senior Design Laboratory course, taught by Prof. Makela have developed a new sensor useful for protecting firefighters from extreme heat.  The full story can be found here.

New research site for African skies

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Prof. Makela's research group recently installed new instrumentation at the Oukaïmeden Observatory in Morocco.  The full story from ECE Illinois can be found here.

University students "spoof" to increase security of power grid, other applications

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The research RSSS graduate student, Thomas Gehrels, is conducting on mitigating GPS spoofing threats is summarized in this article by the Daily Illini.